Hurricane Gustav library links

Here’s a quick roundup of library-related Hurricane Gustav links. Please add yours by commenting on this post.

Louisiana Library Status Blog

Library Director’s Blog: Lafayette (Louisiana) Public Library: Gustav Eve – August 31 – 9pm

ACRL Guest Blog Post: Loyala University Prepares for Hurricane Gustav

Gulf Coast Braces for Potential Category 3 Hurricane

LibraryThing Hurricane Gustav Thread (not quite library related, but a community of book lovers)

Lakeview area quiet… (library as pick up site)

Chinese American Librarians Association Coordinating Donations

The Chinese American Librarians Association has set up a website for donations to support earthquake recovery efforts in China.

You can also read from American Libraries a report on the status of select libraries in China after the  earthquake.

The Library Project Organizes Donation Program for China

Of course, as soon as I say nothing is happening yet with rebuilding schools … I come across this:

The Library Project has created a program, “Earthquake Affected Regions“, to help rebuild the educational system that was affected as a result of the earthquake. It is projected that hundreds of elementary schools have been damaged in the Sichuan and Shaanxi Provinces. The Library Project will be providing books and libraries for elementary schools and orphanages as they are rebuilt or repaired.

Holding back from writing more

Like the rest of the world, I’ve been watching with horror the stories emerging from Myanmar and China.  Because I have no way of finding any information about schools or libraries in those countries, beyond what everyone else can read in the news, I’ve held back from writing anything about the disasters.  My eyes will be open to news once the immediate effects of the disaster have moved to the more long-term rebuilding efforts.  I hope readers will feel free to share news as they hear it as well.

CNN Library hit by tornado in Atlanta

My poor Dad, who lives in the Atlanta area, got a call from me late last night as I watched the story of a tornado ripping through Atlanta unfolding on CNN.  He’s okay and the house is okay, but apparently there has been some heavy damage and some serious injuries, particularly in East Atlanta’s Cabbagetown.  The CNN Library took a hit as well.

Windows also were shattered in the CNN.com newsroom, with staffers saying that there was a computer missing — apparently sucked through one of the windows. CNN’s library was also damaged.

Apparently windows were shattered in the library.  The library serves as a research center and archive for CNN television and websites and other Turner companies.

Inland Empire Libraries Disaster Response Network

I just recently came across the Inland Empire Libraries Disaster Response Network, which has been around since 1987.  They have some issues with their website, including annoying spam pop-ups, but their is a wealth of information about their efforts to contribute to disaster preparedness in the Inland Empire area of California.  I don’t see anything about their most recent wildfires, so I’m not sure how much this is being used.  Seems like the right idea though.

Community building for libraries – the players

I knew when I started this blog that I was treading in some familiar, and well-written waters. Kathleen de la Pena McCook, Chrystie Hill, Librarian (whoever he/she is), and the many, many others who tackle libraries as institutions that build communities are already leading the way. I hope I can contribute some small part to this large and important conversation.

The Cultural Amenities Project is setting out to find how arts influences social and economic well-being in cities.

What does community building have to do with disaster preparedness? This article from Ashoka reflects a trend developing amongst policy makers and disaster preparedness experts that a strong and economically vibrant community can withstand the trauma of a disaster much better than one that is poor and vulnerable.

Who else out there is talking about libraries building communities?